Uber And Lyft Plan Being All-Electric. Lots Has To Change

An electric Uber cruises in Kiev

Getty Images

Last week, Uber UBER followed up Lyft LYFT by announcing that all Uber rides by 2030 would be electric. It’s a lofty goal, and they are pledging resources to it, including giving drivers $1.50 extra per ride (riders pay $1 for an Uber Green) and providing funds to help people convert. They say they will commit “$800M of resources” by 2025.

The problem of course, is that Uber doesn’t own the cars in its fleet. It has to convince Uber driver/owners to switch to electric cars. In my earlier article, “Why isn’t your Uber electric?” I outlined some of the barriers to this. After all, electric cars are much cheaper to operate — cheaper energy, lower maintenance — than gasoline cars, so people driving all day get an obvious financial win by driving the lowest operating cost cars around, even though the cars today are expensive. Here are some of the problems and what Uber might be able to do about them.

One of the dark secrets of Uber/Lyft is that many drivers are not fully savvy on the math of operating their car. They may make about $1.50/mile they drive, but some of them only look at the raw operating cost — gasoline — and figure they are getting good pay for their time. The problem is that fuel can be just a quarter or even less of the cost of running a car. They might figure, “sure the car is depreciating and maybe I have to take it in for service more often” but they don’t see those costs while they drive. It’s a win for Uber to have drivers think they are better paid than they are. It’s also partly true, in that some of the depreciation is just by the year, and the owner/driver is already taking that upon themselves even if they don’t drive.

All of this goes away if the driver has to rent or lease a car just for gig-driving. Then they get a monthly bill for the car that includes everything and will compare it to what they made and how many hours they worked (or sat idle waiting for rides.) As many studies have pointed out, that’s not so nice a number, though it’s still a job.

Continue reading
  8 Hits
8 Hits

An Oil Cartel Turns 60: OPEC Through The Years

September 14 marks the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Companies (OPEC). OPEC is known for shifting the oil market, sometimes to the detriment of consumers, but the story of OPEC is more than just rich Middle Eastern autocrats holding meetings in Vienna while oil traders hang on every word and gesture.

OPEC logo and a stock market graphic. (Photo illustration by Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket ... [+] via Getty Images)

LightRocket via Getty Images

Here are a few interesting stories from the past 60 years.

Foundational Meetings

In 1958, an American oil journalist with a well-known independent streak named Wanda Jablonski introduced the oil ministers of Venezuela and Saudi Arabia. Venezuela’s oil minister, Juan Perez Alfonso, was searching for a way for his country to influence the price of oil, because traditionally prices were determined by the large international oil companies (IOC’s). The Saudi oil minister, Abdullah Tariki—rumored to be Jablonski’s lover and was known as a firebrand Arab nationalist—wanted countries to control their own oil resources.

Continue reading
  8 Hits
8 Hits

Former Energy Executive And Her Writing Partner Encourage Industry To Do Better

What happens when a white, female, petroleum engineer and former energy executive teams up with a Black male writer during a time of heightened social upheaval and the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement? As JoAnn Meyer and Vic Brown tell Rebecca Ponton, they engage in “Uncomfortable Conversations.”

JoAnn Meyer worked as an oilfield roustabout during summer internships in college and had a ... [+] successful 30-year career as an industry executive.

JoAnn Meyer

JoAnn Meyer: I spent almost 30 years with E & P companies, including the last decade as a senior vice president. I had been with the [Aera Energy] family my entire career and I was curious to see what [difficulties] other companies have. I learned that everyone’s challenges are pretty similar. That realization compelled me want to help organizations help their people be enabled, empowered and included. Clearly, the oil and gas industry has some opportunities in the areas of diversity, inclusion and equity, but what we’re doing has a broad application.

Vic Brown: I started as an on-air radio announcer and in television broadcasting, and moved into production, directing and writing commercials, and eventually went out on my own as a content writer and marketing strategist. I had a lot of opportunities to work within corporate settings and I learned how to navigate those environments from a cultural standpoint as a Black man and watch how women, people of color, other minorities or marginalized groups, [maneuvered]. Being Black, the constant reality is learning to navigate spaces where you may be the only person who looks like you. In my career, most of the people I’ve worked with have been women. So, as a man, too, you have to learn to navigate those spaces and be cognitive of the needs of the people around you, and also be able to explain the differences you bring to that environment.

RP: Coming from such diverse professional backgrounds, how did the two of you meet or connect?

Continue reading
  8 Hits
8 Hits

New State And City-Led Measures Are Promoting Building Electrification

Zero-emissions commercial coffee roaster

Bellwether Coffee

In 2015, the United States and representatives from nearly 200 countries reached a landmark agreement to combat climate change and transition towards a low carbon economy at COP 21 in Paris. In the agreement, countries agreed to limit the rise of global temperature to below 2°C by 2100 and signal to global financial and energy markets a fundamental shift away from fossil fuels and towards zero-carbon energy. At the time of signing, then-President Barack Obama described the agreement as “a strong, enduring framework to set the world on a course to a low-carbon future”. However, in June 2017, President Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement — creating a void in leadership at the federal level on climate change. Shortly after this announcement, mayors from 407 U.S. cities and more than a dozen states — representing 40% of the U.S. economy — committed to reducing fossil fuel emissions and achieving the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement in response to President Trump’s decision. 

Over the past few years, a key initiative for U.S cities to decarbonise their economy and respond to the climate crisis has been to reduce dependence on natural gas, which accounts for 32% of U.S. primary energy consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. As part of the initiative, a growing number of cities have policies to discourage natural gas equipment in new buildings and passed laws to encourage all-electric construction. By encouraging this climate-friendly transition, these city-led efforts have started to create structural changes that are helping reduce carbon emissions in buildings, showcase the viability of electrified products and attract new capital to decarbonise carbon-intensive industries. These measures will also help cities and state governments meet their Paris Agreement commitments to transition to a low carbon economy. 

Promote the adoption of electrical products in buildings

In the United States, energy use in buildings - from heating and cooling homes to lighting offices is responsible for about 40% of all carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. In 2018, the burning of natural gas for heating and cooking in buildings alone contributed 10% of total US CO2 emissions. The recent city-led policies opposing natural gas and encouraging all-electric construction are designed to decarbonise the buildings sector and spur innovation to help accelerate the adoption of electrical products. 

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

Brazilian wildlife under pressure - in pictures

Original author: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters
  11 Hits
11 Hits

If the people of NSW keep electing koala hating monsters they will all be gone by 2050 | First Dog on the Moon

All that koala habitat that burned during the bushfires - should we let it grow back? Hell no!

Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are publishedGet all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading...
Original author: First Dog on the Moon
  11 Hits
11 Hits

Investors that manage US$47tn demand world’s biggest polluters back plan for net-zero emissions

A group representing investors that collectively manage more than US$47tn in assets has demanded the world’s biggest corporate polluters back strategies to reach net-zero emissions and promised to hold them to public account.

Climate Action 100+, an initiative supported by 518 institutional investor organisations across the globe, has written to 161 fossil fuel, mining, transport and other big-emitting companies to set 30 climate measures and targets against which they will be analysed in a report to be released early next year.

It is the latest step in a campaign by climate-concerned shareholders to force business leaders to explain how their targets and strategies will help reach the goals of the 2015 Paris agreement.

The targeted companies are responsible for up to 80% of global industrial greenhouse gas emissions. They include mining giant BHP, which last week promised to reduce emissions from its operations by 30% over the next decade on a path to net zero by 2050 after sustained pressure from activist shareholder groups.

Others on the list include Exxon Mobil, PetroChina, BP, Royal Dutch Shell, Rio Tinto, BlueScope Steel and major Australian energy companies AGL, Santos, Woodside and Origin.

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

Forests That Survive Megafires Prove Good Management Trumps Climate Change

Decades of prescribed burning saved Shaver Lake forestlands from California's high-intensity ... [+] megafire.

Southern California Edison

Over the last few days, California Governor Gavin Newsom, other politicians, and the news media have pointed to climate change as the single most important cause of historic, high-intensity “megafires” ripping through California and Oregon. 

“This isn’t about ideology,” tweeted Governor Newsom, adding “What we are experiencing is an existential climate crisis.” 

But California’s leading forest scientists say that fire suppression and the accumulation of wood fuel, not climate change, are what’s made California’s fires more intense.

“Climate dries the [wood] fuels out and extends the fire season from 4-6 months to nearly year-round but it’s not the cause of the intensity of the fires,” said US Forest Service scientist Malcolm North. “The cause of that is fire suppression and the existing debt of wood fuel.”

Continue reading
  11 Hits
11 Hits

Country diary: there's new life in Miss Willmott’s Ghost

Allendale, Northumberland: A spider has anchored its nest to flowers and stems, linking the sea hollies in fine threads

Sea hollies are actually umbellifers and very attractive to insects. Photograph: Susie White

The summer boom may be over but there are still insects feeding from the sea hollies in my garden. There’s nectar in their steely grey tops though the lower flowerheads are browning and going to seed. White-tailed bumblebees work fast, probing the tiny clusters of five flowers, interspersed with spiny barbs, that are rhythmically arranged in tall domes. This is Eryngium giganteum, also known as Miss Willmott’s Ghost, which is named after Ellen Willmott, an early guerrilla gardener who left a trail of seeds in the gardens she visited.

I’ve seen the native wild eryngo, E maritimum, growing in the gravels of the north Norfolk coast. A shorter plant, its flowers are metallic blue and burr-shaped and, like my garden variety, protected by a silver ruff of viciously spiked bracts. Sea hollies are actually umbellifers and, like so many of the apiaceae, very attractive to insects, in this case to wasps in particular.

Continue reading
  11 Hits
11 Hits

Is San Francisco's nightmarish echo of Sydney's summer now a template for fire seasons to come? | Kirsten Tranter

People love to say that Sydney is like San Francisco: a city built around the water with a temperate climate and a pretty bridge. At certain moments the slant of light on the water of San Francisco Bay looks uncannily like Sydney. Australian foliage thrives here — eucalypts, flowering gums, bottle brush, colourful lantana. Over the seven years that I have spent here in the Bay, after growing up in Sydney and living on the US east coast for a long stretch, those echoes usually bring a nostalgic frisson, a bittersweet longing for home.

Now, in September 2020, the reminders of Sydney are frankly alarming. I returned to Australia exactly one year ago with my family for a long sabbatical, just in time for the unprecedented horrors of the bushfire season when smoke choked the cities, ash rained down, and an estimated three billion animals perished. We came back to Berkeley a few weeks before the coronavirus lockdown in March. Over the past several weeks, the fires raging along the west coast have delivered sharp parallels with our Sydney summer.

The creepy glint of orange sun reflected in car hoods, the awful thickness to the occluded light, the suffocating smoke, the ash falling and settling like snow, the air quality readings that break the charts – it’s all a nightmarish echo of Sydney. It’s also a reminder of 2018, when deadly fires across California blanketed the Bay in smoke. That summer marked our first purchase of N-95 masks, which we now wear everywhere, not just to filter the smoke but also the virus.

Australian friends are reaching out to me right now after seeing footage of the startling orange San Francisco skies, and photos I’ve posted on social media of my four-year-old son shining the flashlight on our deck in Berkeley through the twilight morning of 9 September, when it stayed dark all day.

Friends sympathise with how terrible it is to be going through this again. A few of them reflect anxiously on the possibility that they, too, could be looking forward to a repeat experience.

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

Death toll rises as fires choke US west coast and Trump response is lambasted

The death toll from wildfires choking the west coast of the US continued to rise on Sunday as authorities feared more bodies were likely to be found in the charred ruins of towns across several states, and politicians lambasted Donald Trump for his response to the escalating crisis.

In Oregon, where emergency managers warned the public to expect “a mass fatality incident”, 40,000 fled their homes, more than half a million were under some level of evacuation order, flames scorched more than a million acres and the state fire marshal was replaced.

At least 35 people are known to have died since mid-August: at least 10 people have been killed in the past week throughout Oregon, with officials saying the number is likely to rise. In California, 24 people have died, and one in Washington state.

In Oregon, dozens more were reported missing, although local reports on Sunday suggested most had since been accounted for.

Firefighters continued to battle almost 100 separate wildfires, including in Washington state, where a child was killed, and in Idaho and Montana. Across all affected states, the fires have consumed 4.6 million acres, CNN reported.

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

Can Joe Biden Decarbonize The U.S. Power Sector By 2035?

A solar farm system on the campus of Arizona State University in Phoenix, AZ. Joe Biden's energy ... [+] plan would dramatically boost solar power generation in the U.S. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Corbis via Getty Images)

Corbis via Getty Images

Last week’s article focused on the nine key elements of Joe Biden’s plan for a Clean Energy Revolution and Environmental Justice. Today, I want to focus more narrowly on Biden’s goal to decarbonize the U.S. power sector by 2035.

Although some of the “big picture” elements are laid out on Biden’s website, many of the details are lacking. However, Biden has discussed some of those details in campaign speeches.

In a July campaign speech in Delaware, Biden discussed decarbonizing the transportation sector. He said his administration would “build and install a network of 500,000 charging stations along our existing and new highways” so electric vehicles (EVs) can displace gasoline. He also mentioned plans to offer cash rebates to trade in older vehicles. This is notable because it would actually boost the demands on the power sector, which will increase the challenges of decarbonizing the sector.

He spoke about retrofitting lighting with LED systems to save energy, and on energy efficiency:

Continue reading
  11 Hits
11 Hits

UK must become global leader in tackling climate crisis, says CBI

Britain needs to step up and become a global leader in climate action, creating a number of green jobs and boosting productivity to help the economy recover from the coronavirus pandemic, the CBI will say on Monday.

Launching the organisation’s “green recovery roadmap”, the CBI’s director-general, Carolyn Fairbairn, will call on the government to take ambitious steps nationally and use the rest of this year to reignite global efforts to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Its recommendations to the government include creating jobs and energy savings by retrofitting homes and buildings to be more energy-efficient, pumping money into the development of sustainable aviation fuels, and kickstarting the creation of a hydrogen economy in the UK as part of efforts to find new, cleaner ways to heat the UK’s homes and businesses.

In the run-up to the autumn budget a growing number of organisations are putting forward their demands and wishlists aimed at stimulating job creation, supporting millions of households at risk of unemployment or financial difficulty and tackling the climate emergency.

Fairbairn is expected to say that this feels like a time of fiercely competing goals, with the world facing two seemingly separate yet fundamental problems: Covid-19 – the biggest health crisis in living memory – and climate change, the defining challenge of the modern era.

Continue reading
  12 Hits
12 Hits

UK must become global leader in tackling climate crisis, says CBI

Britain needs to step up and become a global leader in climate action, creating a number of green jobs and boosting productivity to help the economy recover from the coronavirus pandemic, the CBI will say on Monday.

Launching the organisation’s “green recovery roadmap”, the CBI’s director-general, Carolyn Fairbairn, will call on the government to take ambitious steps nationally and use the rest of this year to reignite global efforts to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Its recommendations to the government include creating jobs and energy savings by retrofitting homes and buildings to be more energy-efficient, pumping money into the development of sustainable aviation fuels, and kickstarting the creation of a hydrogen economy in the UK as part of efforts to find new, cleaner ways to heat the UK’s homes and businesses.

In the run-up to the autumn budget a growing number of organisations are putting forward their demands and wishlists aimed at stimulating job creation, supporting millions of households at risk of unemployment or financial difficulty and tackling the climate emergency.

Fairbairn is expected to say that this feels like a time of fiercely competing goals, with the world facing two seemingly separate yet fundamental problems: Covid-19 – the biggest health crisis in living memory – and climate change, the defining challenge of the modern era.

Continue reading
  11 Hits
11 Hits

Global oil demand may have passed peak, says BP energy report

BP has called time on the world’s rising demand for fossil fuels after finding that demand for oil may have already reached its peak and faces an unprecedented decades-long decline.

Demand for oil may never fully recover from the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, according to the oil firm, and may begin falling in absolute terms for the first time in modern history.

BP’s influential annual report on the future of energy, published on Monday, says oil will be replaced by clean electricity from windfarms, solar panels and hydropower plants as renewable energy emerges as the fastest-growing energy source on record.

Spencer Dale, BP’s chief economist, said the company’s vision of the world’s energy future had become greener due to a combination of the Covid-19 pandemic and the quickening pace of climate action, which has hastened “peak oil”.

The report in effect sounds a death-knell for the growth of global oil demand after two of the report’s three energy scenarios for the next 30 years found that demand reached a peak in 2019.

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

West Coast Wildfires Reveal Massive Governance Failures

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 09: Bay Bridge in smoke from various wildfires burning across ... [+] Northern California. (Photo by Philip Pacheco/Getty Images)

Getty Images

The U.S. West Coast is on fire. As per the National Interagency Fire Center, ninety-seven large fires have burned 4.6 million acres. This is about the size of Slovenia. 

How a society handles disasters says a lot about its resilience, character, and governance capacities. Disasters can foster paranoia or encourage solidarity. They can bring the country together or tear it apart.

In the 2020 wildfire season, there are numerous stories of the bravery of firefighters and local law enforcement agencies. For instance, California National Guard pilots are flying their helicopters in dangerous conditions for firefighting and rescue operations.

There is also a proliferation of conspiracy theories. In Oregon, the FBI and local Sheriffs’ departments have issued statements debunking the claim that Antifa supporters started these fires and urging citizens not to overload the 911 system with false reports. Facebook is removing false claims about these fires. As political polarization deepens with the approaching November 2020 elections, it’s anybody’s guess how these conspiracy theories will evolve.

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

Trump Embraces Corn Ethanol As The Election Draws Near

US President Donald Trump arrives on stage to speak following a tour of the Southwest Iowa Renewable ... [+] Energy ethanol plant in Council Bluffs, Iowa on June 11, 2019.

AFP via Getty Images

Reports surfaced last week that President Trump had directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reject a series of applications for biofuel waivers submitted by U.S. oil refiners. The move is the latest, and likely last, development in a major drama that has pitted traditionally red constituencies against each other, with farm states battling against big oil. For most of his presidency, the Trump administration has sided with the oil lobby and granted relief from biofuels mandates, but with an election year upon us the president’s allegiances have shifted.

The regulation at the center of this dispute is known as the Renewable Fuel Standard, or RFS. Established by law during the last Bush presidency in 2007, the program was developed during an era of falling U.S. oil production as a strategic initiative to ensure domestic energy security. As esoteric as it may seem, the regulation underpins an ethanol industry that generated more than $46 billion in revenues in 2018 alone. Since ethanol is produced from corn, the RFS directly supports farm economies across the U.S. midwest, with the bulk of production centered in Iowa and the surrounding states.

The RFS has few fans in the oil industry, however, as the program adds compliance costs and overhead. When the regulation was passed, the oil lobby secured a waiver program in the legislation, allowing small refiners to obtain exemptions from biofuels mandates. Under the Obama administration, few waivers were issued. But once Trump came in to office, the floodgates opened and over 30 waivers were granted in the first two years of the administration, including to large refiners. Biofuels mandates for other refiners weren’t increased to compensate, and ethanol prices fell steeply. By 2019, the value of the ethanol credit (known as a ‘D6 RIN’) had collapsed to just a quarter of its value from 2 years earlier, its lowest level since 2013.

The battle was on: Chuck Grassley (R-IA) attacked the EPA, saying the organization had “screwed us”. Lobbyists for farmers and ethanol producers unloaded criticism on administration officials. Lawsuits were filed to challenge the validity of the waivers. Ethanol producers closed facilities and went out of business. Throughout this process, the Trump administration tried to mollify corn growers and made various promises to farmers. The promises, however, turned out to be hollow and the administration failed to deliver. It seemed as if farmers and ethanol producers were on the losing side of the fight.

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

A Sneaky Tropical Storm Or Hurricane Threat In The Gulf Of Mexico - What You Need To Know

Updated 11:11 am on September 20th to reflect 11 am advisory information and the increasing threat of a hurricane.

This weekend marks the “peak” of the Atlantic hurricane season, and if you look at the latest National Hurricane Center tropical weather outlook, nature is right on schedule. At the time of writing Saturday morning, I count six areas systems including two Tropical Storms (Paulette and Rene), Tropical Depression Nineteen, and three areas of interest. Tropical Depression Nineteen is the one that I want to focus on because it is a sneaky little threat for Florida and the Gulf Coast states.

American GFS model forecast for what could be Tropical Storm Sally near the Louisiana coast by ... [+] Monday afternoon.

NOAA and Tropical Tidbits website

Our meteorological models have been sniffing out the possibility in recent days that Tropical Depression Nineteen could be a problem for Florida and the Gulf Coast states. Brian McNoldy, a hurricane expert at the University of Miami, writes an excellent blog that I highly recommend for everyone. On September 10th he wrote, “Aside from Tropical Storms Paulette and Rene in the central Atlantic, there are two weak waves in the western Atlantic — one approaching the Bahamas and heading west, and another west of the Florida peninsula and heading west.”

Recommended For You

While he wasn’t bullish on them becoming tropical cyclones, he also noted, “but it's not out of the question either.” By September 11th, some of our regional models had become extremely bullish on the system approaching Florida. IBM/The Weather Company tropical weather expert Michael Ventrice tweeted, “12Z HWRF is trying to spin up Invest #96L into a strong Tropical Storm/low grade Hurricane as it pushes over the warm Northeastern Gulf of Mexico waters early Monday morning.” The American GFS and European model now have similar trends for the storm to likely become “Sally.”

Continue reading
  11 Hits
11 Hits

Slow-Moving Hurricanes Near Coasts Are Flood Nightmares - Why Sally Is A Threat

Several years ago I was monitoring Hurricane Harvey (2017) as it approached Texas. I knew that it was going to be a major storm with all of the things associated with that categorization. However, phase 2 of Harvey looked equally daunting because the storm was projected to stall. With my meteorology background, I knew that meant a flood disaster was on our hands. Hurricane Florence (2018) evoked similar concerns as it stalled in the Carolinas. Tropical Storm Sally is currently on approach to the U.S. Gulf Coast and is expected to intensify to a Category 2 hurricane before landfall. There is something else about the forecast that worries me, however. It slows down near the Gulf Coast and that could be a recipe for flood problems too.

Forecast track for Sally and potential rainfall (inches)

NOAA

I want to draw your attention to the 3 circles with an “H” in the graphic above. The time frame between the first one at 8 pm (Monday) and the third one at 8 pm (Tuesday) is 24 hours. It is important to remember that hurricanes are not dots on a map but large rain-producing machines. Hurricane Sally slows down as it approaches the Gulf Coast and lingers for roughly a day before making landfall. Even after it weakens to a tropical storm, it will still cause rainfall in the region. That’s a problem folks. A 2019 study published in one of the top science journals, Nature, found that hurricanes are stalling more often along North American coasts so this is something we better get used to, unfortunately.

Tropical Storm Sally early Sunday morning prior to sunrise. The storm is expected to be a hurricane ... [+] as it approaches the U.S. Gulf Coast.

NOAA, CIRA
Recommended For You

Like Hurricane Harvey (2017) and Hurricane Florence (2018), Sally has the potential to be a life-altering rainfall event. The latest projections from NOAA suggests that rainfall totals will be within the 1 to 2 feet range, and isolated higher amounts are never out of the question. I always sound the alarm for this type of storm because the manner in which hurricane impacts are communicated is often biased towards the wind threat or category. The Saffir-Simpson scale, however, conveys nothing about rainfall. In fact, Harvey and Florence dumped the majority of flood-producing rainfall well after being “downgraded” to a lower category hurricane or tropical storm.

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

Covid-19 drives leaders to make unprecedented interventions but what next?

For years, those on the left in Britain have been arguing that the government should be more aggressive in its use of state aid to revitalise those parts of the country affected by industrial blight.

Now, at last, we have ministers prepared to have a bare-knuckled fight with the EU over their right to intervene on behalf of those living where the factories and the coalmines used to be, but they grew up as disciples of Margaret Thatcher, who insisted that tough state aid rules be included in the rules for the single market. Ah the irony of it!

In the past six months Boris Johnson’s economic policy has owed more to Tony Benn’s alternative economic strategy than to free-market principles. A willingness to nationalise failing industries? Check. A bigger role for the state? Check. Help for businesses contingent on them agreeing to rules of conduct set by the government? Check. Treasury-backed loans to struggling companies? Check. A decade of austerity to repair the damage caused to the public finances? Forget it.

Johnson has actually gone even further than Benn suggested in the 1970s and early 1980s. The AES did not suggest that the state should have the right to tell a family of five that they couldn’t invite two grandparents round for tea. It was all about intervention in the workplace, not telling people what they could do in their own homes.

Governments everywhere are questioning whether globalisation is all it is cracked up to be

Continue reading
  10 Hits
10 Hits

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://energy-grants.co.uk/